Post-University MGT 303 Homework Help 2

Get help for Post-University MGT 303 Homework Help. As early in the week as possible, please enter into a dialogue with me and your classmates on D. Quinn Mill’s writings about work rules and restrictive work practices, above. Briefly answer the following homework questions from your text on or before Sunday. 1. Which factors influence a firm’s ability to pay? 2. List the rules of ERISA that employers with pension plans must comply with. 3. Which characteristics of grade structures must be negotiated? 5. Why are grievance procedures a high-priority bargaining issue for unions? Explain with an example. 6. What is meant by “dues check-off” and how does it benefit all parties? Briefly answer the following homework questions from your text on or before Sunday. 2 is also due on Sunday (submitted below). 1. Which factors influence a firm’s ability to pay? 2. List the rules of ERISA that employers with pension plans must comply with.

3. Which characteristics of grade structures must be negotiated? 4. Why was the Fair Labor Standards Act enacted? 5. Why are grievance procedures a high-priority bargaining issue for unions? Explain with an example. 6. What is meant by “dues check-off” and how does it benefit all parties? Ordinarily non-economic or non-wage issues are tackled first during a Labor Contract negotiations with wage and benefit issues settled as a package near the end of negotiations. Why is this the case? Do you have any contrary experience? Briefly answer the following homework questions from your text on or before Sunday. 1. What aspects of the existing contract are usually reviewed by the management preparing for negotiations? 2. Identify the important points that should be kept in mind by the management while preparing data for negotiation. 3. Briefly explain the basic rules governing the bargaining process. 4. Bargaining includes four behavioral components. 5. What were the union demands in response to companies’ request for concessions in the 1980s? Were these demands successful? 6. What is an impasse?

When does it occur? 7. How does mediation facilitate settlement? 8. Explain the four different types of strikes. 9. Explain the purposes of picket lines. 10. What is a slowdown? Why is it difficult to take action against employees protesting in this manner? 11. List the different employer responses to strikes. Please comment on the article Five Common Grievance Issues from the Steward’s Sourcebook. Recently a group of experienced union reps suggested we run an article tackling some of the issues they run into most often. Here then are five common grievance situations and suggestions for how to approach them. When your supervisor gives you a directive you believe violates the contract or standard job procedures, it is important to point out the mistake he or she is making. ” “I don’t have seniority.” Or whatever applies. But if the supervisor insists that you do the work, do it. Later on, you can file a grievance; but if you refuse to comply with a direct order, you’ll be disciplined for insubordination, and an arbitrator will uphold the discipline.

Arbitrators reason that when the company and the union negotiated their grievance procedure, they did so to avoid work disruptions caused by job disputes. The work continues, productivity is maintained, and the problem gets solved later — through the grievance procedure. The only exception to this rule is when the directive would put you at serious risk of injury. In that case, save your body now and grieve later. Often a member will want to grieve an issue despite there being clear language in the collective bargaining agreement (CBA) that goes against his or her position. As tempting as this argument might seem, you are not likely to convince management or an arbitrator. The CBA is what both sides agreed to. What has been allowed to occur is irrelevant, regardless of how widespread the practice might have become. Adhering to the language in the contract protects both parties. If the tables were turned, would you want to give up 10 minutes of your lunchtime just because the second shift has been taking only 20 minutes when they are allowed 30?